News Briefs: 501 streetcar route now split

The 501 Queen streetcar has begun a new trial route split to improve reliability, short turns and speed up overall travel time.

Starting Oct. 19, the west portion of the route now runs from Long Branch Loop to Parliament St. and the east portion of the route runs from Neville Park Loop to Shaw St.

The temporary route change will be in effect for all 501 Queen and 301 Queen service from Monday to Friday. Saturday, Sunday, and holiday service will not be changed.

The trial will run until Nov. 20. Results of the split will be evaluated in January.

Queen Triangle Development

A new six-storey development in the Queen Triangle has received the green light from city hall.

Richard Ziegler will construct a mixed-use building with 28 residential units and commercial space on the ground floor at Queen St. East and Rainsford Rd. The five homes and two mixed-use buildings currently on site will be demolished. The owner is helping pay moving expenses for existing tenants.

Ingrid Furtado, president of the Beach Triangle Residents Association, had concerns about the development, but said the owner has addressed some of them in meetings with the community.

“The issues were shadow impacts, privacy concerns and we have strained infrastructure in the area,” she said.

Furtado said the privacy concerns have been addressed as there are sufficient setbacks on the upper floors of the new development so it won’t be too close to existing homes.

Even though the narrow laneway behind the site will be widened in parts, Furtado is still concerned as trucks force through the space for deliveries and garbage servicing.

“We have all these children walking through the laneways to go to school,” she said.

But overall, “we are happy with it,” Furtado said. “It’s a good development for the neighbourhood.”

For more on this development and other neighbourhood issues, visit the BTRA’s website at www.beachtriangle.com[/url].

Biosolids public feedback

The city’s Biosolids Master Plan was released Oct. 1 with a month for public review.

The 713-page report outlines what Toronto should do with the byproduct from treated sewage and wastewater over the next decade.

The direct impact for Beach residents centres on the recommendations for the Ashbridges Bay Treatment Plant at Lakeshore Blvd. East and Leslie St.

This report suggests that at Ashbridges, biosolids should be disposed of in a cake form applied to land, as a fertilizer or, as a last resort, sent to landfill. Burning biosolids has been ruled out as an option for this location.

See the report online at www.toronto.ca/wes/techservices/involved/wws/biosolids[/url]. And to make a comment before the end of October, send an email to [email=biosolids@toronto.ca]biosolids@toronto.ca[/email] or call Nancy Martins at 416-392-4390.

Gull and Firkin liquor licence

Councillor Sandra Bussin is keeping an eye on a liquor licence application for a restaurant and bar at 1943 Queen St. East, near Elmer Ave.

Bussin’s motion to city council on Oct. 1 indicated a licence to sell liquor on the patio at the Gull and Firkin is against the public’s wishes. City staff will attend the upcoming application hearing before the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario to ask that conditions be applied to any licence at the pub.

The city’s suggestions include ceasing alcohol service at 11 p.m. from Sunday to Thursday and at 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday nights, and having patrons vacate the patio after those times. The city also suggests against having speakers, TVs or live music on the patio at any time.

School pools saved and in danger

Queen Alexandra Senior Public School is one of four pools the Toronto District School Board voted to save from closure because there is sufficient permit revenue to keep it operating.

Seven pools have closed permanently, including at Danforth Tech. There are nine left on a probationary list until the end of December. If enough money is raised and permits holders are found, the unlucky nine pools will stay open past 2009.

Pools at Monarch Park CI and Earl Grey PS are still in danger of closing.

In the case of Monarch Park, the community has to cover incremental operating costs close to $71,726. For Earl Grey, the amount is $55,940.


About this article:

By: Kris Scheuer
Posted: Oct 21 2009 2:04 pm
Filed in: NEWS
Edition: Toronto
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